LAXMI PARASURAM

   Laxmi Parasuram is the mother figure of all members of SISK. She is one of the founding members of the original Soroptimist Club of Calcutta founded in 1979 and has remained an indefatigable Soroptimist all these years. She initiated and sponsored two new Soroptimist clubs in India – SI Burdwan, West Bengal and our own SI of South Kolkata in 2005.
She has been National Program Action Co-ordinator for Soroptimist
International of Great Britain and Ireland(SIGBI) 1998-2000.
Laxmi has attended various meetings and conferences of SI federations at Sydney, Montreal, Glasgow, and Kuala Lumpur, SIGBI conferences and Dublin and Wales as National PAC, and in Burbados, Durbon, and Bournemouth.
Laxmi is a true Soroptomist at heart! She has availed Friendship
Grant Tours and home hospitality in New Zealand South, Canada and USA (Camino Real, Rocky Mountain, Seattle and Post Angeles. )

Is there an opportunity to grow up differently when one joins the
SoroptimistsIt is a question that has puzzled me as I go about as a
member of this august body and commit myself to educate, empower
and enable girl children as well as those adult women who have had
no opportunities to grow up and blossom into their own true selves.
How does one grow up as a Soroptimist? Certainly not only in years,
as many of us do and live with an achievement of having crossed forty
or fifty years as a club member. A members growth as a Soroptimist
that I would like stress is much deeper, since it is a change in
personality, attitudes and world view and so it may be seen as an
evolutionary growth than simple biological accumulation. 

There are many factors that bring about such a growth and relating them to a process of change and growth not only over the years, but through some intense moments of a global awareness of sisterhood and a vision of the future. During our normal Soroptimist activities of collection, distribution, raising funds and attending meetings are we likely to forget this aspect of personal growth Perhaps not! Getting together with other members from different vocations, high or low, should help to put us on a road to equality. I mean here not the road to equality with men, but with women from various countries, regions, class and caste. I remember that one of the clubs I visited in America had a cook as a member along with other white-collar members. This helps people of different backgrounds understand about each other. A common goal or mission can bind the members together to march ahead with optimism. We can see why the word optimist is in our name. In a world torn apart by creeds and conflicts, optimism remains the backbone of change and progress. Attending conferences and friendship tours Milestones to our growth as Soroptimists. Expensive ventures of course, but we gain more than displaying our new and different outfits that receive recognition. Sisters from more affluent countries help you with your luggage when we find no porters, they eagerly buy the jute bags and greeting cards made by the poor, they even push a wheelchair when one has a disability (as they did for me in California). Such instances of affection and help are always stored to verify our real growth in Soroptimism.

INDIRA VENKATESH

Indira Venkatesh is a true Soroptimist! She is one of thefounding members of SISK, having joined in 2005. A teacher by profession and a Social Worker
at heart, Indira has always been associated with various NGOs: Mulund Jaycees in Mumbai, Lions Club in Mangalore and was a founding member of Dignity Foundation in Kolkata. Since joining SISK, she has been a very active member, taking part in all activities, especially teaching the children in our SuryaKiran Project of CSPD (Communication Skills and Personality
Development) Saturday Classes.
The most important contribution of Indira to SISK, has been her efforts in Fund Raising for the Club. A very committed member, Indira has always been the first to reach out to her vast resources of friends and networks, with remarkable success. SISK is very indebted to her in this area.
On a lighter note, Indira is the member who always reminded all members to remember to wear our SISK badges for every meeting!

 – Ranjana Pillai.

OH ! THE MESS THAT STRESS CREATES
Stress has become a part of our daily life. It will be a surprise if one says that they have never experienced stress. Stress is a natural feeling of not being able to cope with specific demands. This happens to all of us at
sometime. Some common symptoms of stress are headaches, sleeplessness, palpitation, muscular pain? the list is endless. They manifest as emotional problems like anger, anxiety, guilt, low self esteem, feeling demotivated or unfocussed and if neglected finally leads to depression. It is also prevalent in women when they go through biological changes like menopause. Many a time women get depressed on the loss of her spouse or illness in the family.
Depression also sets in some men after retirement especially those who have been workaholics, to cope with the very thought of being tied up at home, unless they develop some new interests.

Nowadays, even children are succumbing to it because of excessive study material and never-ending tests and exams. Children start exhibiting unusual behaviour like biting nails, temper tantrums and throwing around when in anger. Parents instead of getting angry with such children, they need to be more emphatethic towards them and reason out by taking them into their confidence.

Occasionally some children may need medical help to calm them down.
To tackle this problem, one needs to keep certain things in mind:
1.  Time management
2.  Aim for perfection to the extent possible without overstretching oneself.
3.  Prioritization and making choices.
4.  Adopt a positive mindset, self belief, exercise, good sleep, humour, music, cultivating a hobby etc are some ways of reducing stress and most of all, staying in touch with your friends and family. These will definitely relax you and your capacity to cope with stress will improve.
Keep smiling and make others smile.
-Indira Venkatesh